THE LOGAN’S RUN ANALOGIES

Turns out I’m not the only guy excited about LOGAN’S RUN. Other folk are picking up on the relevance of the film to our own situation. For instance, I just re-read the foreword by Daniel H. Wilson for the 2015 edition of the novel. Here’s what he includes in his intro to the book:  “This [Logan’s Run]is an insidious dystopia in which children are forced to pay for the mistakes and shortcuts taken by long-dead generations of adults (who, let’s face it, should have known better). The true enemies are not the Sandmen who hunt runners, but past generations— the departed adults who built a broken society that new generations cannot abide. The rebellion of youth is a timeless, universal struggle, which may explain why the story has had such staying power.” *
        Recent films like Hunger Games and Maze Runner continue this theme. The older generation would be wise to consider this factor. “Adults” need to remember that fiction has as much influence in our lives as fact and that when young people can’t rightly say what’s bothering them,  they must turn to a work of fiction to do it for them.  These dystopian films cry out loud and clear what Cat Stevens was saying in his song Father and Son: “It’s hard to be calm when you’ve found something going on.”  Young people are tired of being told to be calm, when obviously there’s something going on that needs to be fixed.
        I am amazed how science fiction writers can address ideas society likes to sweep under the carpet. Maybe talk some more about this tomorrow?

LINK TO: THE LOGAN’S RUN ANALOGIES, EPISODE1

 


*[From:
William F. Nolan & George Clayton Johnson, LOGAN’S RUN, Vintage Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC, New York, ©1967/ emphasis mine, from pg XV of the Foreword]
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